SUMMER CAMPS FOR KIDS 2018

It’s almost that time of year (dare we say…Summer!) Start planning your child’s summer camp experience now. Have a hard time looking for camps in the Colorado area? We’ve got you covered. We’ve included summer camps for Gifted, LD/ADHD children as well as general summer camps that include science, nature, or the arts. (Please be aware that we do not endorse these camps but rather provide a list based on our online research. If you have any experience good or bad to share regarding camps on our list, let us know at iqtestingdenver@gmail.com )

Useful tips to get you started:

  • Include your child in the process; their “buy in” is essential, ensuring you both get the most benefit out of the program you select.
  • There are many quality summer programs with excellent instruction and facilities, so narrow down your options to a few and then explore as much as you can about each one.
GIFTED

 Mad Science of Colorado

Ages 6-11.  Mad Science camps offer a daily combination of in-class discovery, outdoor games, physical activities and hands-on applications of the scientific principles presented! From biology, forensics and astronomy to chemistry, physics, engineering and more, elementary-aged campers are invited to explore a wide range of exciting concepts with Mad Science! Save 15% with coupon code DPCAMP18 at the time of registration!

Date info: Camps are hosted Monday-Friday with both half-day (9:00AM-12:00PM) or full-day (9:00AM-4:00PM) options. Please visit our website for a list of dates by location.

Cost info: $199 half-day, $289 full-day, $319 Robotics

Website: colorado.madscience.org/campexperience.aspx

 PG Retreats

PG Retreat is a community of families with profoundly gifted children and teens with measured IQ above 145. Although every child is unique and beautiful in his or her own way, profoundly gifted children often have a difficult time finding true peers within their day-to-day communities. PG Retreat helps to form connections and friendships, and to share resources and experience.  PGR brings children and teenagers together for shared connections and community.

Website: https://pgretreat.org/

 JA Business Week

Open to students in grades 9-12. Forget everything you think you know about summer camp. JA Business Week, presented by Arrow Electronics, Inc., is like nothing you’ve experienced before. It’s a knowledge-building, confidence-boosting, network-growing, college-application standout of a summer experience. And if you aren’t convinced quite yet, you should know that you’ll stay in the dorms on the beautiful campus of Johnson & Wales University in Denver, giving you sneak peek into college life. Unlike any camp, this unique program allows you to explore leadership concepts and build confidence alongside more than 120 of Denver’s most dynamic and accomplished business leaders. In addition to interactive workshops on marketing, business ethics and budgeting, the week culminates in a competition rivaled only by “Shark Tank.” Students attending for the first time will work on designing a new cell phone case and marketing plan for OtterBox, an electronics accessory company headquartered in Fort Collins. Returning students will work as consultants for Arrow Electronics. Students returning for the third or fourth time will dive deeply into what it takes to start their own business right now, with the guidance of three young entrepreneurs who figured it all out on their own.

Specialty: JA Business Week is a unique program that allows students to explore leadership concepts and build confidence alongside Denver’s most dynamic and accomplished business leaders.

Cost info: The cost to attend JA Business Week is $550. Tuition assistance is available.

Website: JABusinessWeek.org

University of Northern Colorado Summer Enrichment Program for GT students

Summer Enrichment Program (SEP)

SEP is a two-week residential program at the University of Northern Colorado consisting of high-interest, hands-on, brains-on courses for gifted, talented, and creative students entering grades 5 through 10.

Courses are developed by specialists in gifted education and/or in specialized content areas as part of the university’s Center for the Education and Study of Gifted, Talented, Creative Learners.

Curriculum is developed and differentiated according to basic principles of gifted education, providing a unique opportunity for enrichment not ordinarily possible in regular classrooms.

Visit their website at: www.unco.edu/summer-enrichment-program/summer-enrichment-program.aspx

Enrichment Corner CSM Summer Program & Camp Neuro/Camp Cardiac: https://tech.mines.edu/summer/index.html

Wings Aerospace Academy Charter: Parent Information Nights: https://wingsaerospaceacademy.org/

For Parents/Adults

Gifted Development Center Presents Gifted Women Symposium June 2, 2018 www.gifteddevelopment.com/events/gifted-women-symposium-denver

For Teachers

Gifted Education Summer Symposium: Underrepresented Populations June 28-29, 2018 https://www.cde.state.co.us/gt/giftededsummersymposiumflyer

For an extensive list of interesting summer camps check out the Jefferson County Association of Gifted and Talented website’s Summer Programs 2018 JAGC http://www.jeffcogifted.org/summer-programs.html

Missoula Children’s Theatre Tour

The primary goal of MCT – indeed, the organization’s mission – is the development of lifeskills in children through participation in the performing arts. Within each MCT cast, girls and boys are equal; the disabled become able; the shy experiment with bravery; the slow are rehearsed to perfection; and the gifted become part of the whole. The lesson they learn is that all of them are necessary for the show to go on. Few arenas exist where responsibility is taught and learned so clearly. MCT provides a unique opportunity to learn the lessons of group dynamics while excelling as an individual – a lesson from art that carries into life. MCT strives to use participation in the performing arts as a vehicle to develop lifeskills including social skills, communication skills, self-discipline, a strong work ethic, an understanding of the team concept and self-esteem.

Visit their website at: http://mctinc.org/mct-tour/missoula-childrens-theatre-tour/

What is a tour residency week?

A tour team arrives in a given town in their “little red truck” loaded with a set, lights, costumes, props and make-up, everything it takes to put on a play…except the cast. The team holds an open audition and casts 50-60 local students to perform in the production. The show is rehearsed throughout the week and two public performances are presented at the end of the week.

Colorado Tour Cities and Dates:

CO ARVADA MEIKLEJOHN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 04/23/2018 04/28/2018 GULLIVER’S TRAVELS
CO AURORA ALTURA ELEMENTARY 05/14/2018 05/19/2018 TREASURE ISLAND
CO CASTLE PINES CASTLE PINES ARTS & CULT FOUND 07/16/2018 07/21/2018 THE PIED PIPER
CO COLORADO SPRINGS ROCKRIMMON ELEMENTARY PTO 10/08/2018 10/13/2018 KING ARTHURS QUEST
CO DENVER BROMWELL SCHOOL 11/05/2018 11/10/2018 BLACKBEARD THE PIRATE
CO GOLDEN RALSTON ELEMENTARY 10/01/2018 10/06/2018 ROBIN HOOD
CO GUNNISON GUNNISON ARTS CENTER 08/06/2018 08/11/2018 KING ARTHURS QUEST
CO LOVELAND CITY OF LOVELAND – RIALTO THEATER 06/25/2018 06/30/2018 THE PRINCESS AND THE PEA
CO NORTHGLENN NORTHGLENN ARTS & HUMANITIES 08/06/2018 08/11/2018 THE PIED PIPER
CO PUEBLO SANGRE DE CRISTO ARTS CENTER 07/30/2018 08/04/2018 THE PIED PIPER
CO RIFLE NEW UTE THEATER SOCIETY 07/23/2018 07/28/2018 THE PIED PIPER
CO WESTMINSTER N METRO ARTS ALLI/HYLAND HILLS P&R 06/11/2018 06/16/2018 THE PRINCESS AND THE PEA
CO WIGGINS WIGGINS ELEMENTARY 05/07/2018 05/12/2018 THE SNOW QUEEN
LEARNING DISABILITY/ADHD

Questions you may want answered before registering:

  • How will your child’s disability be accommodated?
  • What other types of disabilities are represented at the camp?
  • How many campers attend, and what is the staff-to-camper ratio?
  • What are the ages of counselors, and what training do they have?
  • Who dispenses ADHD medication? When and where? Are their doctors on staff?
  • How do camp counselors handle discipline?
  • Is academic tutoring available? Is it individualized?
  • Do counselors set goals for campers? How is progress tracked and rewarded?

The Learning Camp
The Learning Camp is specifically for kids with learning disabilities such as ADHD, dyslexia, and other LD challenges. The program provides traditional summer camp adventures for boys and girls ages 7 to 14 combined with carefully designed academic programs. Their mission is helping kids with learning disabilities build self-esteem, independence, and academic success.
Website: learningcamp.com
Email: information@learningcamp.com
Phone: 970-524-2706
Location: Vail, Colorado

Rocky Mountain Village

Rocky Mountain Village in Empire, Colorado is regarded as one of the top Easterseals camps in the country. Rocky Mountain Village is fully accessible and used by more than 800 children and adults with disabilities during the summer camp sessions. Campers enjoy swimming, fishing, overnight camping, outdoor cooking, travel camp, day trips, arts & crafts, sports and recreation, hiking, dances, music & drama, horse-back riding, and riding the zip-line.

Website: http://www.easterseals.com/co/our-programs/camping-recreation/rocky-mountain-village.html

For more information, contact camp at campinfo@eastersealscolorado.org or by phone at 303-569-2333.

Super Star Summer Camp 2018

We are very excited to invite you to be a part of our supportive community and join us for our 4th year of our life-changing, confidence-building, literacy camp. We are offering a program created specifically to build and improve skills in reading and spelling, with additional support in writing and math. This camp is designed for students entering 1st – 9th grade who are identified with dyslexia or who otherwise struggle with reading, spelling, writing and math.

Dates: June 11th – July 13th, 2018 – Southeast Denver

Location: 1091 S. Parker Road   (Galilee Baptist Church)

Dates: June 18th – July 20th, 2018 – Lakewood/Littleton

Location: 3898 South Teller Street  (Denver Christian School)

(This location will feature options for will full and half day  camp so that all of you children can enjoy camp at the same location)

Session Times: 8:15am -11:30am or 9:15am -12:30am

​* We meet with each child individually pre-camp to determine grouping.

Website: https://www.everychildreading.net/superstar-summer-camp

Breckenridge Outdoor Education Center Camps

Summer adventure camps with the BOEC bring children with disabilities and special needs into the outdoors to inspire self-awareness and self-confidence.  The BOEC believes in safe, dynamic and invigorating activities that are in harmony with the natural world.  We adapt our programs to accommodate many ability levels and emphasize care and compassion on all of our adventures.  Activities include ropes courses, rock climbing, rafting, canoeing, handcycling, camping, fishing and many others.  Campers stay in our beautiful Griffith Lodge high above Breckenridge.

Website: https://www.boec.org/programs/open-enrollment-courses/wilderness-camps-for-dd/

GENERAL; Science, Nature, Arts & Theater

University of Colorado Science Discovery

Science Discovery offers a wide variety of classes for ages 4-16. Math, science and technology are taught with hands-on activities that are fun and informative. Their enthusiastic, knowledgeable and experienced teachers utilize university and community resources to produce a stimulating environment, both indoors and out, and a variety of field experiences. New classes are offered each summer.

Website: http://sciencediscovery.colorado.edu/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/Summer-2018-Brochure-WEBSITE.pdf

South Platte Park Summer Nature Programs

Discover how much fun nature can be by playing in the forests and ponds. Naturalists guide activities and nature games, provide a safe atmosphere and spark curiosity.

Description: Nature camp experiences at South Platte Park include goldpanning, crawdad catching, insect sweeping, pioneer princess adventures, geocaching, wildlife watching, Jr. Rangers, Kids Nature Clubhouse and much more.

Dates/days/times vary depending on the program.

Cost info: Camps vary from $9 – $235 depending on choice

Website: ssprd.org/Catalog.aspx?pc=62f1b191-45b9-484c-9188-e414909b0913

E-mail victorias@ssprd.org

Space Voyage Summer Camp

Located in Lakewood Colorado, Space Voyage programs bring to life the importance of math and science, reinforces concepts identified in academic content standards, build confidence through genuine achievement and offer a fun place for kids to imagine the possibilities, learn and grow.

Website: http://www.spacevoyage.com

2018 Brochure: https://www.spacevoyage.com/sum-2018/pdf/space-voyage-brochure.pdf

Denver Botanic Gardens

The Gardens has camps for kids only that are full of garden explorations, games, activities, cooking and plants to take home. Grow your mind, plant a new friend and dig into nature with week-long camps at Denver Botanic Gardens and Chatfield Farms.

Date info: Garden Camps: March 26-30, June 11-15, June 18-22, June 25-29 Farm Camps: June 11-15, June 18-22, June 25-29

Cost info: $270 non-member, $250 member

Website: botanicgardens.org

Arts HUB Camp

The Arts Hub runs art related camps in the spring and a variety of high quality theater, dance, art and film camps in the summer. Our new 12,000 square foot facility includes art and dance studios and a full, professional 200-seat theater.

Date info: March 26-29; June 5-Aug 31. 9 to noon or 9 am to 4 pm, plus before and after camp care options.

Cost info: $35-$395

Website: artunder.org

Chess Camp (24th Annual)

June and July camps where students learn chess logical-thinking and strategic-planning. All ages and abilities…multiple sections. 24th Annual Denver Rocky Mountain Chess Camps. Learn scorekeeping, etiquette, tournament preparation, logical-thinking and strategic planning. Workshops, tournaments. Full and half-day options, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Multiple dates. See website.

Website: ColoradoMasterChess.com

Cookies & Cursive: Penmanship for Youth

Ages 8-12. Give your child the “write” advantage in school and life with traditional and expert cursive instruction. Discover the joys of cursive and quality penmanship through our fun and personalized program.

Date info: Camps are in 2-week blocks

Cost info: $225 for tuition and materials per 2-week camp

Website: cookiesandcursive.com

2018 Youth Journalism Day

This is a one-day, intense and fun learning experience for kids ages 8 to 14. Here’s a great chance for budding journalists, writers and photographers to spend the day with professionals learning about: What makes a good story Getting ready for an interview Asking good questions Writing & photography tips Campers will work to produce a special Colorado Kids issue to be published July 31st.

Website: ColoradoNIE.com

AeroCamp

AeroCamp is a weeklong summer day program for middle school students age 13-15. AeroCampers learn about airplanes, flight, and careers in aviation and aerospace through hands-on activities and learning experiences.

Specialty: Aviation and Aerospace Education

Cost Info: $795

Website: aspenflyingclub.com/aerocamp

Silicon STEM Academy Summer Camps

Silicon STEM Academy Summer Camps are a fun, hands-on and interactive way to keep young minds active during the summer months. We offer camps for every interest in subjects like Programming, Game Design, Robotics, Digital Media, Engineering, Science, E-Textiles and more! Camps are offered in a week-long, half-day format, with full-day options available. We now offer camps in three convenient locations and Colorado parents voted our STEM camps the #1 Family Favorite in 2017! Check out our ALL NEW weeklong, full-day STEM Academies for advanced students!

Cost info: Camp prices range from $295 to $350

Website: siliconstemacademy.com/summer-camps

Lighthouse Writers Workshop

Lighthouse Writers Workshop supports creative discovery and renewal by providing the writing workshops and writer services to young authors of all abilities. Talks, events, summer camps, and youth workshops strive to develop the writer in everyone. Ages: 9 and up.

Visit their website at: https://lighthousewriters.org/workshops

Bits, Bytes, & Bots

Bits, Bytes & Bots offers a variety of classes including robotics, stop-motion animated movie making and game creation. “Our curriculum is always on the cutting edge of the technology and our robotics program utilizes the Lego® Mindstorm® robots. People ask us what the difference is between our programs and other technology programs available and we proudly tell them that WE TEACH!”

Visit their website at: http://denverco.bitsbytesbots.com/?page_id=33

Stanford University Youth Camps

Inspired Learning in a Great Environment!

Volleyball, science, soccer, digital media! Whatever your interest, Stanford’s Summer Youth Camps have you covered. Choose from over 20 youth sports camps and 30 youth academic programs, available to students age 7-18. Our world-class athletic facilities, academic resources and acclaimed leaders are here to make your summer youth camp experience special. Besides a fun and inspiring learning environment, Stanford’s summer academic or athletic youth camps provide students the opportunity to:

  • Make new friends
  • Gain valuable skills
  • Broaden their outlook on life
  • Experience Stanford’s exceptional services

Visit their website at: https://rdeapps.stanford.edu/camps/

Happy Camping,

~Turning Point Assessments Team

SLOW PROCESSING SPEED (referred to as SPS in this article)

Understanding what slow processing is and the role it may play in your child’s life is essential. Slow processing speed is not an official diagnosis in and of itself, but it can be an associated feature of ADHD or a learning disability. Children with slow processing speed do benefit from effective interventions, so it’s important that it be properly determined and addressed. When it’s not addressed appropriately, other problems may emerge or it can lead to low self-esteem or problems at school.

What Processing Speed Is

“Processing speed is the pace at which you take in information, make sense of it and begin to respond. This information can be visual, such as letters and numbers. It can also be auditory, such as spoken language.”

“Having slow processing speed has nothing to do with how smart kids are—just how fast they can take in and use information. It may take kids who struggle with processing speed a lot longer than other kids to perform tasks, both school-related and in daily life.”

“For example, when a child with slow processing speed sees the letters that make up the word house, she may not immediately know what they say. She has to figure out what strategy to use to understand the meaning of the group of letters in front of her. It’s not that she can’t read. It’s just that a process that’s quick and automatic for other kids her age takes longer and requires more effort for her.” See the full article here: https://www.understood.org/en/learning-attention-issues/child-learning-disabilities/information-processing-issues/processing-speed-what-you-need-to-know

What Slow Processing Speed Looks Like

Slow processing speed can affect kids in the classroom, at home and during activities like sports. Kids might have trouble with:

  • Finishing tests in the allotted time
  • Finishing homework in the expected time frame
  • Listening or taking notes when a teacher is speaking
  • Reading and taking notes
  • Solving simple math problems in their head
  • Completing multi-step math problems in the allotted time
  • Doing written projects that require details and complex thoughts
  • Keeping up with conversations

Parents and teachers may notice that a child:

  • Becomes overwhelmed by too much information at once
  • Needs more time to make decisions or give answers
  • Needs to read information more than once for comprehension
  • Misses nuances in conversation
  • Has trouble executing instructions if told to do more than one thing at once

Key Takeaways

  • Slow processing speed can affect the ability to make decisions quickly.
  • Trouble with processing speed can affect a child’s executive functioning skills.
  • Having your child evaluated can reveal problems with processing speed.

Further Understanding

It’s not unusual for gifted students to have slow processing speed. For more information, including how to address slow processing speed, read the following article from the Davidson Institute: https://www.davidsongifted.org/Search-Database/entry/A10782

As doctor Steven Butnik, Ph.D. put it “When they go unrecognized and their needs go unaddressed, gifted students with a slower pace can feel discouraged and demoralized. However, once they are understood and efforts are made to help reduce the impact of the slower pace, these students’ best abilities can shine. Parents may need to take the lead and arrange for evaluations, educate those involved in their children’s lives, and provide their child with unwavering support and encouragement.”

Veronica Almeida authored a wonderful article on the educational website, We Have Kids, called Understanding Slow Processing Speed in Children. Below are some of her ideas on how to help your children deal with slow processing speed and how you can support them at home. Her full article can be found here: https://wehavekids.com/education/Understanding-Slow-Processing-Speed-in-Children

How to help your child deal with slow processing speed:

If your child has a learning disability or other problems, it important to address the main problem in priority. It is actually a very good idea to have your child assessed by the trained professionals in your child’s school, or a school psychologist in private practice with either an MA or Ph.D. in educational psychology. (Clinical psychologists can also make a diagnosis but may not have the breadth of assessment training or experience in learning disorders as a trained school psychologist. Note: retired teachers, even special education teachers, are not qualified to make a diagnosis.) A professional assessment can avoid misdiagnosis and provide the appropriate routes to address your child’s issues.

However, there are a few things you can do at home to help your child deal with slow processing speed:

  • For each task, break it down into smaller easy-to-grasp steps;
  • Provide your child with clear and short directions to follow;
  • Set out times for completing tasks, using timers, schedules, clocks – this will be challenging but with patience and practice your child can learn to manage their time better.
  • Reduce distractions around your child – if your child is drawing, turn off radios, TV or computers and put away other toys that are not being used by your child.
  • Give gentle reminders of time or of next steps;

Things you should NOT do:

  • Do not take it personally – it is not your fault or their fault;
  • Do not overwhelm your child with too many things to do at once;
  • Do not react emotionally or blame the child;
  • Do not punish the child for taking too long – they don’t do it on purpose.
  • Do not overtly compare the child to other children in the attempt to get them to do things faster – this will hurt their self-confidence instead.
  • Do not assume the child just needs to pay attention and that’s all, thus ignoring the signs.

Whatever you do, give them your support and understanding

Unfortunately slow processing speed can easily go unnoticed in a child, causing her/him anxiety and feeling like they are not as smart as others, or even dumb in nature. Their confidence can be shattered and eventually it shows in school performance and even at home. Many of these children are very bright and would excel in many areas, but often their anxiety and low self-confidence (as consequence of SPS) can get in the way of that. Even if SPS is recognized, parents and teachers can fail the child by getting impatient, increasing the child’s anxiety, which in turn slows them down even more.

It is important to support your child and let them know that having slow processing speed does not, in any way, mean they are not smart. By feeling supported, and with the appropriate techniques, these children can thrive and have a chance at a bright future.

Children with slow processing speed are not dumb! On the contrary, many actually have great critical thinking, are dedicated and are quite smart in many areas. Any decline in performance in any area, usually comes from not addressing their processing speed, or from the frustration that comes with SPS – presented by the child, parents and teachers.

A good support system, one full of understanding and patience, help children feel confident about themselves, making it easier for them to take on any obstacles they encounter. (Veronica Almeida 2017)

What exactly is “Twice-Exceptional” (2e)?

Twice-exceptional students are those who are identified as gifted according to state criteria in one or more of the categories of giftedness (cognitive, academic, creative, leadership, or arts). In Colorado, these students, once identified, are most likely provided with an Advanced Learning Plan (ALP).

AND

Identified with a disability according to federal/state criteria – and the disability qualifies them for either an Individual Education Plan (IEP) or a 504 plan.

General Twice-Exceptional Information

What you need to know.

Twice-exceptional children tend to fall into one of three categories. These categories help explain why students often go through school without the services and stimulation they need:

  • Students whose giftedness masks their learning and attention issues. These kids score high on tests for giftedness but may not do well in gifted programs. These students use their exceptional abilities to try to compensate for their weaknesses. But as they get older, they may be labeled as “underachievers” or “lazy” as they fall behind their gifted peers.
  • Students whose learning and attention issues mask their giftedness. Learning and attention issues can affect performance on IQ tests and other assessments for giftedness. For example, since many of these tests require language skills, kids with language-based challenges may not perform well. These kids may be placed in special education classes, where they become bored and possibly act out because they aren’t being challenged enough. Some of these children are identified, wrongly, as having emotional problems.
  • Students whose learning and attention issues and giftedness mask each other. These kids may appear to have average ability because their strengths and weaknesses “cancel each other out.” Consequently, these students may not qualify for gifted programs or for special education programs.

Here are some early signs that your child could be a twice-exceptional learner:

  • Extraordinary talent in a particular area, such as math, drawing, verbal communication or music
  • A significant gap between your child’s performance in school and his performance on aptitude tests
  • Signs of a processing disorder, such as having trouble following spoken directions or stories that are read aloud

There isn’t a simple, one-test for identifying twice-exceptional children. Determination will require professionals at the school including the Special Educator, School Psychologist, Social Worker, and Nurse. Private practices can also diagnose twice-exceptional. Whether the school or private practice is enlisted to help, they must be familiar with this population and its unique presentation. Misdiagnosis often occurs with this population. A good place to start is for you and the teachers to keep records of what your child excels in and struggles with. Be on the lookout for “disconnects” between how hard your child is studying and what kinds of grades your child is making.

How to Help Your Child

With the right supports and encouragement, twice-exceptional learners can flourish. Talk to the school. If you suspect your child may be twice exceptional, request a meeting with the school’s special education coordinator. Discuss your concerns, and ask about types of tests. The Colorado Department of Education endorses an IEP and ALP (advanced learning plan) be put in place to meet the needs of the twice-exceptional student in the public-school setting. This process can be daunting, so some districts have 2e advocacy through their GT department.

Seek advice from a local expert: Turning Point Assessments has specialized in twice-exceptional identification for 30 years and can help you decide if a private evaluation is needed. We can identify gifted and twice-exceptional students and provide individualized recommendations based on strengths and challenge areas. Many schools are grateful to receive this information to help with educational planning for a 2e student because they have not had training or experience with this population.

Ask to stay in the gifted program. If your child has been identified as gifted but is not doing well in that program, request that he be assessed for learning and attention issues before any decisions are made about removing him from the program.

Make the most of your child’s IEP and ALP. If the school determines that your child is twice exceptional, use the annual goals in his IEP to address his weaknesses and the ALP to nurture his gifts. Be prepared to brainstorm—and to be persistent!

Find other twice-exceptional kids. Encourage your child to spend time with children who have similar interests and abilities. This can help him celebrate his strengths and feel less isolated. You may be able to connect with twice-exceptional families through Understood’s parent community.

Empower your child. Help him understand what his gifts and weaknesses are. Reassure him that he can get support in the areas where he struggles. But resist the urge to rush in and rescue him every time he gets frustrated. It’s better to help him learn to cope with his mixed abilities.

Why it’s important for a 2E child to receive a 504 or advanced learning plan (ALP):

Some organizations estimate that there are hundreds of thousands of twice-exceptional learners in U.S. schools. But there are no hard numbers because so many of these students are never formally identified as being gifted, having a disability or both. Students who are gifted and disabled are at risk for not achieving their potential because of the relationship that exists between their enhanced cognitive abilities and their disabilities. They are among the most frequently under-identified population in our schools. Twice-exceptional students present a unique identification and service delivery dilemma for educators. Often educators, parents, and students are asked to choose between services to address one exceptionality or the other, leaving twice-exceptional students both under-identified and underserved in our schools.  In order for them to not only reach their potential and be understood we need to learn how to accommodate their needs in the classroom so that they can strengthen their weaknesses and maximize their strengths. Like all other students with disabilities, gifted students with co-existing disabilities have the right to a free appropriate public education.

Resources

Resources for parents, teachers and professionals helping twice-exceptional children reach their potential.

Sources:

Peg Rosen: Gifted Children’s Challenges with Learning and Attention Issues. Retrieved from: https://www.understood.org/en/friends-feelings/empowering-your-child/building-on-strengths/gifted-childrens-challenges-with-learning-and-attention-issues

Colorado Department of Education: http://www.cde.state.co.us/sites/default/files/documents/gt/download/pdf/twiceexceptionalresourcehandbook.pdf